BLEACHER REPORT

Features for Bleacher Report:

So You Think You Know Lonzo Ball…(10.9.17):
The real Zo is still the 10-year-old boy who understood passing was like double-dutch: all rhythm and all timing. He calculated the precise second to throw the ball from one end of the court so that it soared over the hands of defenders and onto the fingertips of teammates at the other end without touching the ground. The real Zo is a 13-year-old boy whose AAU team trailed by one with 20 seconds left. He drove to the basket, fooling the crowd by passing to his center, wide open underneath the basket, instead of shooting it himself. Clank. Ball’s team retrieved the ball with seven seconds left. “I’m going to give you the ball again,” an unfazed Ball told his visibly dejected center. “Be ready.” Ball whipped the ball to the center again—to the chagrin of over-zealous parents—but this time, the big man delivered the buzzer-beater layup. The real Zo is a 14-year-old freshman challenging a senior for a starting varsity spot at Chino Hills High. “Are you nervous?” whispered John Edgar Jr., another childhood best friend, at tryouts. “Nah,” Ball said. “I’m not nervous at all. What do you mean?” Ball earned the nod. The real Zo is an 18-year-old man elevating a struggling UCLA squad to a No. 2 standing and Sweet 16 appearance in 2016-17, leading the nation in assists. “His strength is his speed,” says Steve Alford, UCLA’s coach. “You can’t catch him.” The real Zo is now 19—and every move he makes must be immaculate. He has to end his workouts with a swish, once sinking 20 three-pointers but refusing to leave until the net finally surrendered to the 21st. If he’s writing a rap verse and doesn’t like a line, he’ll crumple up the paper, throw it in the trash and start over. He’s a night-crawler. An owl. A bat. He might doze off for four, five hours, but that’s usually only during the day. There are too many step-back jumpers to release, too many sprints to complete, before dawn. (READ FULL STORY HERE).

The Real First Family of Hoops (7.20.17):
The Ogwumikes are the type to play next-after-next-after-next-after-next-after-next in pickup, looking bewildered when everyone else in the gym starts taking off their kicks to call it quits. All four Ogwumike women, whose last name means “warrior” in Igbo, one of the national languages of Nigeria, are relentless. “No matter how we feel when we walk on the basketball court, we all have this sense of pride, so we always work hard,” Erica says. Last season, Chiney took a nasty elbow to the mouth. She felt her tooth shake—it fell out the next day—but she kept playing. Only now has she set up an appointment for an implant. Nneka has a three-inch scar on the right side of her body from diving into the scorer’s table while playing for the Polish team CCC Polkowice in the Final Eight of Euroleague in Russia. She hopped right back in the game. Olivia has been whacked in the head as an undersized forward more times than she’d like to remember. Erica is the only Ogwumike to wear a mouth guard, as she boxes out players a head or two taller than she in the paint. “We’ve all had our battle scars,” says Chiney, who is sitting out this season to rehab a left Achilles injury. Don’t try any of them. Come for one and the other three will come for you. “Nneka was willing to throw down for me,” Chiney says. She remembers when Nneka almost beat up someone in high school for making fun of her for delivering lunch announcements in Cy-Fair High School’s cafeteria with the tenor of a State of the Union address (she was the president of the student council). And if you foul Chiney nowadays, the Hurricane will thunder the next time you face L.A. “Nneka will use up her four fouls,” Chiney says. But as young girls, Nneka and Chiney ran from competition. Actually, it was just Chiney, who at nine years old, hid in the bathroom during their first AAU practice while Nneka, 11, grudgingly endured the two-hour ordeal. “She was brave,” Chiney says. Nneka disagrees. She didn’t have a choice; one sister had to show face. (READ FULL STORY HERE).

How Mo’ne Davis made her hoop dreams come true: Inside Life after Little League (2.21.17):
Mo’ne Davis calls for the ball. She drains a three, holding her follow-through for a second longer as she and a teammate battle two others for most threes made during a drill. “BOOM!” the boys on the sideline shout. Davis, wearing white and chrome Nike Kobe A.D.s, scurries around the perimeter, releasing shot after shot. “They cheatin’!” Davis hollers, waving her arms and hip-checking one of her opponents. She pops three more in a row. “Oh yeaaaaahhhh,” she says, bouncing up and down, sensing victory. Davis has been knocking down shots at Philadelphia’s Marian Anderson Recreation Center with these same boys—her teammates on the Anderson Monarchs, a youth recreational team—for the past eight years. The center’s gym, with its four rows of brown bleachers, its cream-colored wall tile and its green and white scoreboard, has long been home to the 15-year-old—since before she became an American sensation in 2014 as the first girl to pitch a shutout in the Little League World Series; before she starred in Spike Lee’s Chevrolet commercial; before she couldn’t walk anywhere without fans approaching her for pictures.(READ FULL STORY HERE).

BIG3 Thinking Bigger (8.29.17):
“Rick!” Kenyon Martin screamed as he walked in. “You a bad mof–ka, man! Rick a bad mof–ka!” Coach Rick Mahorn, the hustler, the former Detroit Piston “Bad Boy” Martin grew up idolizing as a kid from Saginaw, Michigan, had been the first to enter the press room after his Trilogy squad won the first-ever championship crown for the BIG3, co-founder Ice Cube’s half-court three-on-three basketball league for former NBA players. Mahorn looked exhausted, as his team had clawed back from an 11-point first-half deficit against the Gary Payton-coached 3 Headed Monsters at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas on Saturday. Mahorn had slowly reached for a chair, smiling once he got settled. He had a look of pride on his face: “What a great game, s–t,” Mahorn said. “Way to end the season on a great game. I’m still mad we ain’t played perfect.” Then came Martin. Mahorn greeted the former Denver Nuggets star with a headlock hug, and K-Mart flashed a wide smile. Al Harrington, who played 16 NBA seasons, chimed in too, turning to Mahorn: “I love my coach, man. I love my coach. Look at him! I love Unk! I looooove him! That’s all I got to say. I love this man, God damn, I love this man.” Mahorn, Martin, Harrington and the rest of Trilogy—Rashad McCants, Dion Glover and James “Flight” White, the BIG3 Defensive Player of the Year—looked content back in their element, jerseys sweated-through, back at a presser with microphones in front of them, with reporters asking three-part questions, with an urge to get out the next day and dominate again. Squeezed tight together on the podium, they shared the familiar, euphoric feeling that can only come from being part of a team—a feeling the BIG3 brought back. (READ FULL STORY HERE).

Excellence Defined: UConn Women Make History Again with 91-Game Win Streak (1.15.17):
Connecticut wasn’t satisfied with leading SMU by 24 points at the end of the first quarter, 26 at the end of the half, 35 at the end of the third Saturday afternoon. UConn refused to give an inch until the final buzzer sounded. With the 88-48 win, the top-ranked women’s basketball team ascended into hoops immortality. The 11-time national champion Huskies won their 91st straight game, setting the longest streak for consecutive wins in NCAA Division I history for men or women. But Connecticut has been here before. Having topped John Wooden’s legendary UCLA streak of 88 consecutive wins (1971-74) when it won 90 straight (2008-10), the Huskies have outdone themselves. “So many things that have happened at UConn are just beyond anybody’s expectations, beyond anybody’s imagination,” UConn head coach Geno Auriemma said on the SportsNet New York broadcast after the historic win. “It’s almost like it’s a fairy tale. It’s the kind of thing you can’t ever plan for or anticipate.” How could two completely different Huskies teams achieve the improbable in just over six years? “That’s definitely something [Auriemma] instills in us while we’re there: never be satisfied with what you’re doing,” Atlanta Dream guard Tiffany Hayes, who helped UConn set the 2008-10 record, told Bleacher Report. “Even if you’re having a good practice, you can always have a great one,” Hayes said. “His thing was, you can’t be perfect, but if you’re chasing perfection, you can catch excellence.” (READ FULL STORY HERE).

Advertisements