CAL STATE FULLERTON PITCHER JOHN GAVIN WON’T SETTLE FOR ANYTHING LESS THAN GREAT

John Gavin replayed bits of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas game in his head, combing through his pitches that night. The junior southpaw for No. 5 Cal State Fullerton (17-10, 2-1) rated himself on a scale of 1 to 10, as he does after every game, with the scrutiny of a pathologist conducting an autopsy. Except it was just Gavin, alone with his thoughts, in the lab that is his mind. 8? No way (Gavin doesn’t consider 8s, let alone 9s or 10s).
7.5? Nope (He remembered some pitches he left up. He hurried his pitches. He didn’t have as much command of his slider as he had hoped). 7? Hmm. 7.25? Alright, he thought, shrugging his shoulders. I’ll go with that.

Gavin, who pitched a then career-high 7.1 innings of scoreless baseball to help the Titans to a 5-0 win on Feb. 26, measures himself with a different yardstick from his peers. Even as he leads the Big West Conference in earned run average (1.63) in 38.2 innings of work (and, prior to giving up two runs in Sunday’s win over UC Riverside, had tossed 17 consecutive shutout innings), he expects more of himself. Gavin (3-0) doesn’t want to pitch alright. To pitch so-so. To even pitch well. He wants to be great. Nothing less. “John’s the hardest person on John,” said Jim Gavin, his father.

HOW MO’NE DAVIS MADE HER HOOP DREAMS COME TRUE: INSIDE LIFE AFTER LITTLE LEAGUE

Mo’ne Davis calls for the ball. She drains a three, holding her follow-through for a second longer as she and a teammate battle two others for most threes made during a drill. “BOOM!” the boys on the sideline shout. Davis, wearing white and chrome Nike Kobe A.D.s, scurries around the perimeter, releasing shot after shot. “They cheatin’!” Davis hollers, waving her arms and hip-checking one of her opponents. She pops three more in a row. “Oh yeaaaaahhhh,” she says, bouncing up and down, sensing victory.

Davis has been knocking down shots at Philadelphia’s Marian Anderson Recreation Center with these same boys—her teammates on the Anderson Monarchs, a youth recreational team—for the past eight years. The center’s gym, with its four rows of brown bleachers, its cream-colored wall tile and its green and white scoreboard, has long been home to the 15-year-old—since before she became an American sensation in 2014 as the first girl to pitch a shutout in the Little League World Series; before she starred in Spike Lee’s Chevrolet commercial; before she couldn’t walk anywhere without fans approaching her for pictures.

SHOOTER’S TOUCH

Most nights, around 10 p.m., Kaden Rasheed shoots at Life Time Athletic in Laguna Niguel. There is no one else there – just how he likes it – only the bright light, the open space and the hoop.

And eight minutes.

Rasheed, the 6-foot-1 go-to-scorer for No. 2 Santa Margarita High School (12-3), forces himself to make 100 3-pointers in eight minutes, all the while grabbing his own rebounds.

This is no small feat, but the senior has been working at it since fifth grade. Back then, he could only reach 60. Now? That’s unacceptable – he’ll do the drill over until he reaches 100.

“Once you get to 90 and you’re close, your hustle just goes up – it skyrockets,” Rasheed said, “because you want it so bad.”

EXCELLENCE DEFINED: UCONN WOMEN MAKE HISTORY AGAIN WITH 91-GAME WIN STREAK

Gabby Williams swatted a shot. The ball landed in the hands of Kia Nurse, who blazed upcourt and dished to Katie Lou Samuelson in the post, who then whipped a one-handed pass to Williams at the rim for the and-1 layup.

Up by 14 in the first quarter against No. 20 South Florida on Tuesday, the Huskies drew more blood. On the next play, Napheesa Collier intercepted a pass, dove on the floor to retrieve the ball and threw it ahead to SaniyaChong on the break. Chong dropped the ball to Samuelson for a layup in what would become a 102-37 massacre.

This is how the Huskies, who tied their previous streak of 90 that night, squeeze the soul of teams: There is no letup between possessions, between games, between seasons.

HOW FAR CAN JORDIN CANADA CARRY UCLA?

Canada was sick of the missed layups. She and her Windward School prep teammates gasped for air, unable to make seven in a minute on both sides in the full-court drill. Windward coach Vanessa Nygaard, a former Stanford and WNBA player, signaled to keep sprinting.

Canada, motioning for her teammates to clear out and rebound for her, zoomed off. “Jordin was like, ‘I’m going. I’m taking every layup,'” said Nygaard, who doubted one player could accomplish the feat alone. “She dominated it.”

It wasn’t always that way. Unable to dribble as a 6-year-old, Canada was easy prey for the taller kids. “I was always afraid. I would pick the ball up and I would just hold it. I’d panic and crunch down and they would all trap me,” Canada said. “My coach would always have to call a timeout.”

Her coach told her that she’d have to play point guard and learn to take care of the ball. “She didn’t want it,” said Joyce Canada, Jordin’s mother. “She wanted to shoot.”

INSIDE J.J. REDICK’S OBSESSIVE QUEST TO MAKE EVERY SHOT HE TAKES

J.J. Redick doesn’t wait. As DeAndre Jordan swats the opening tip to the Clippers, Redick dashes across the baseline as if gold awaits on the other side. Within seconds, he bolts past his defender to knock down a pull-up jump-shot against the Cavaliers on March 13.

“He’s a freak of nature,” said Pelicans forward Ryan Anderson, Redick’s former Magic teammate. “I can’t think of one person that’s in better shape than J.J.”

Redick soon nets nine of L.A’s first 14 points, as he squeezes into the lane for a floater, drills another shot off the dribble and then pops a three in the corner.

Ten years into his NBA career, Redick has evolved into a more dynamic shooter, matching a career-best 16.4 points, 1.9 rebounds and 1.4 assists a night. He has a blistering 47.5 percent from three and 47.9 percent from the field as the glue of the playoff-bound Clippers. That’s because with every shot he releases and every drill he completes, Redick increases expectations for himself. He must exceed his output each time he steps on the floor.

CAL STATE FULLERTON’S KYLE ALLMAN IS FINDING HIS RHYTHM

Kyle Allman sprinted toward the basket on a fastbreak. He didn’t care that Washington’s Markelle Fultz, considered by some to be the No. 1 2017 NBA Draft pick, trailed closely during a non-conference game in November.

Receiving the pass from point guard Lionheart Leslie, Allman leapt toward the sky, hammering the ball over Fultz for the dunk. Though Allman was blocked, the 6-foot-3, 175-pound Brooklyn, N.Y., native landed undeterred, as his motto has always been: attack, attack, attack.

“He’s just a dog, man,” said guard Jamal Smith, shaking his head, praising Allman’s competitiveness. “He always wants to be that Alpha.”